Course 1: Introduction and Application Scenarios

This learning pathway introduces Linked Data and related semantic technologies, and shows how they can be deployed in web applications. As an example, we target the development of a music portal (based on the MusicBrainz dataset), which facilitates access to a wide range of information and multimedia resources relating to music.

You can study the materials of this learning pathway at your own pace, as there is no predetermined start or end date.

1. Learning outcomes

By the end of this learning pathway you should have an understanding of:

  • the enabling technologies for Linked Data, in particular the RDF data model
  • the current status of Linked Data technology
  • how Linked Data can be applied in a particular scenario related to a music portal

2. Semantic Technologies and Linked Data Foundations

Learn about the foundations of Linked Data, in terms of the related technologies and possible application solutions.

The covered topics are:

  • Motivation scenario
  • Linked Data foundations (introduction to the underlying technologies - HTTP, URIs, XML, RDF, SPARQL)
    • Evolution of the Web
    • Web technology basics (HTTP, URIs)
    • Describing and exchanging data (XML)
    • Semantics on the Web
    • Querying semantic data (SPARQL)

Watch the webinar 'Semantic Technologies and Linked Data Foundations' (73 minutes):

View the slides of this webinar:

Read Part I of Chapter 1 'Introduction and Application Scenarios':

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3. Introduction to Linked Data

Learn about the fundamental principles of Linked Data and what the "Web of Data" is all about.

The covered topics are:

  • Introduction to Linked Data
    • Principles of Linked Data
    • The Web of Data

Watch the webinar 'Introduction to Linked Data' (43 minutes):

View the slides of this webinar:

Read Part II of Chapter 1 'Introduction and Application Scenarios':

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iBook

ePUB

Kindle

4. Test your knowledge

How much have you learned from this learning pathway? Test your knowledge by completing the following exercise.

Study the following RDF statements, expressed in the Turtle syntax, then attempt the exercises that follow. For question 3 you should use the Euclid SPARQL endpoint.

@base <http://www.euclid-project.eu/examples/module1#> .
@prefix vocab: <http://www.euclid-project.eu/ns#> .
@prefix rdfs: <http://www.w3.org/2000/01/rdf-schema#> .
@prefix foaf: <http://xmlns.com/foaf/0.1/> .

vocab:ResearchProject rdfs:subClassOf foaf:Group .

vocab:consortiumMember rdfs:subPropertyOf foaf:member .

<barry> a foaf:Person ;
        foaf:givenName "Barry" ;
        foaf:familyName "Norton" .

<euclid> rdfs:label "The Euclid Project"@en, "Das Projekt Euclid"@de ;
         vocab:consortiumMember <barry> .
  1. Re-express the statements in NTriples (i.e. remove all prefixes and abbreviations to give full triples in absolute URIs).
  2. Add a resource representing yourself, attaching your name using the FOAF properties.
  3. Execute the following SPARQL query and consider why the class "Agent" has members, even though none are explicitly asserted in the data: SELECT ?agent WHERE {?agent a foaf:Agent}
  4. Add a property to "consortiumMember" to assert that all subjects should be research projects (members of the "ResearchProject" class).
  5. Adapt the query from (3) to ensure that "euclid" is now a research project
  6. Create a new property to relate training participants to research projects and use it to relate yourself with "euclid".

Use the Exercise 1 form to try out your RDF and SPARQL.

5. Further reading

If you are interested in more learning materials and resources about Linked Data, here are some suggestions that are relevant to this particular pathway: